Reading Together

Posts Tagged ‘read aloud

I hate snow. 

It’s wet and cold and causes me a great deal of stress when I have to drive in it. 

There are a couple of books I like to read aloud regardless of my feelings towards snow. 

My favorite is:

Snow by Cynthia Rylant

 

Her text makes me actually feel warm while reading about snow.  And the illustrations of the snowflakes are beautiful (by Lauren Stringer).

I have been doing some snow/winter storytimes and have found some great new songs and fingerplays on Mel’s Desk here. Thanks!

I did change the words she had to the following:

Hat, scarf, coat and books (tune: Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes)

Hat, scarf, coat and boots, coat and boots

Hat, scarf, coat and boots, coat and boots

In Wintertime we dress like that

Hat, scarf, coat and boots, coat and boots

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I am beginning a new series of blog posts.  One of the things I enjoy doing the most is reading to my children and doing arts and crafts projects with my daughter.  With Monday being my day off I usually try to do some small art project with my daughter.  I will share those here as well as one of the books we read together on Mommy Mondays.

This Monday’s Art Project:

My daughter loves to paint and I recently bought her watercolors.  She has been painting outside all summer but with fall just around the corner I wanted to make sure she had something else to use inside to keep her painting going. 

When I took out the watercolors she was thrilled.  She went through each color and painted with each one, naming them as she went along.  Then it was mommy’s turn to paint.  I painted some flowers and asked her which colors I should paint with. 

Then I gave the brush back to her and she started painting her fingernails blue!

Then it was Mommy’s turn again.  She asked me to paint a bunny and an octopus.  I wished I could share pictures with you of my masterpieces! After this we made her hand prints which she loves to do! I also painted her name.  She named each letter of her name as we went along!

 Color and letter recognition were the lessons of this simple art project.  I’m sure she’ll be asking to paint again soon!

Book we Read Together Today:

Yummy: Eight Favorite Fairy Tales by Lucy Cousins

yummy

We are loving the stories in this book. Little Red Riding Hood, Hansel, Goldilocks and the Three Bears and The Three Little Pigs are our favorites! Lucy Cousings illustrations are wonderfully eye catching.  This would make a great gift this holiday season.  Be wary however, the author does not change much from the orginals.  Grandmother is eaten by the wolf and the pigs are all gobbled up as well.  Still, I wonderful read aloud.

Once you watch your young child graduate from preschool it is time to prepare for the next step: kindergarten.  This is the most important milestone in your child’s school career.  It can also be a frightening transition for a young child.  New school, new teachers and new friends all make transitioning to kindergarten an emotional experience. The National Head Start Association and the SERVE Regional Educational Laboratory state on their Terrific Transitions website that, “There is a great deal of information indicating that a child’s success in school can be linked, at least in part, to effective transition practices and activities”  (http://www.serve.org/TT/). Parents and caregivers must do their part in preparing their child for this transition into kindergarten.
               Parents can ease the stress of this transition by providing children with literature experiences that discuss this new kindergarten and school experience.  Reading books about a potentially stressful situation, with a parent, can take the stress out of the situation.  Here are a few book suggestions parents can share with their child:

Miss Bindergarten Gets Ready for Kindergarten by Joseph Slate
               A delightful book with fun illustrations by Ashley Wolff depicts a kindergarten teacher and her students getting ready for kindergarten.  It also introduces the letters of the alphabet which is perfect for budding kindergarteners.  The first of a series, this is a must for any preschooler getting ready for kindergarten.
The Berenstain Bears Go to School by Stan and Jan Berenstain
               Sister Bear is nervous about starting school but discovers all the fun stuff she gets to do at school.   Mama Bear helps to soothe Sister’s fears but taking her to the new classroom and meeting her new teacher.  A classic book, which gently acknowledges a child’s fears while easing the stress of starting school.
The Wheels on the School Bus by Mary-Alice Moore
               A favorite song is tweaked to introduce the many people who make up the daily life of a school as they all travel on the school bus.  Children will love to sing along the new verses such as “the librarian on the bus…” and parents can discuss with their children the new experiences and new faces kindergarteners will encounter day to day at their school. 
Kindergarten Countdown by Anna Jane Hays
               Children won’t be able to help getting excited about kindergarten with this appealing picture book.  Rhyming text is perfect for preschoolers and the enthusiasm of the text will rub off on even the most skeptical of would be kindergarteners.
The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn
               Chester the raccoon is reluctant to head off to kindergarten but his mother devises a secret way he will be reminded of her love throughout the day.  Separating from parents can be a tough issue for children who haven’t spent that much time away from home.  This sweet picture book can ease a child’s mind and give parents an idea to help with soothing separation anxiety.
               Parents must acknowledge the fact that moving up to kindergarten is hard for their young child.  Using children’s literature can help with the transition.  Reading together and discussing the situation will help take the stress out of starting school

Most research agrees that TV and DVDs have no benefit to babies and toddlers. DVDs such as “Baby Genius”, “Brainy Baby” or “Baby Einstein” which claim to make your baby smarter actually have no benefit at all according to recent studies.
Best Practices for Parents
Most parents admit to allowing their baby or toddler to watch television. Television is a part of our culture and it is hard to avoid. This is despite the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation that children under age of 2 should not be in front of a television or computer. If a parent is allowing their child to watch television they must be mindful of the fact that their child is not gaining any benefits from their television watching and put limits on how much and when. They should also stay in the room with their child while they are watching. Parent-child interaction is one way to add some benefit to television watching. A parent can comment on what is happening on the screen and connect it to something in the child’s environment such as a favorite toy or book.

What will Make your Baby or Toddler Smarter?
A child’s first and best teacher are their parents. How can parents help ensure there child will have the best beginning? Try these tips. Please note all three tips require no special equipment or DVDs.

1. Read to your Child
Read to your child every day and begin at a young age. Babies enjoy hearing their mother’s voice and they find it very soothing. They also can bond with their father or other caregivers through the simple act of sitting down and reading a book or two. Have books everywhere in the house and allow your child easy access to them. Reading to your child is the best way for your child to develop language skills necessary to succeed in school.

2. Talk to your Child
Babies love the soothing sound of their mothers voice. Tell your baby or toddler about your day. Talk to him about what you are doing step by step. For example, “It’s time to change your diaper” or “Let’s button up your coat.” Go for walks and point out the cars, trees and birds. Say as much as you can to your child and he or she will develop great language skills later on. Also, sing to your child. Babies love being sung to and toddlers love music. You don’t have to have a great voice but songs and rhymes will also help develop language skills and higher IQ.

3. Interact with your Child
Get down on the floor with your baby or toddler and play. Let your imagination and inner child run wild and see what your child sees. Children learn through play and they learn through interacting with the adults around them. Sitting on the floor and interacting with your baby is the best way for your child to learn from you.

The best thing you can do for your child is give her a piece of you every day. So turn off that television and read, talk and play with your baby or toddler.TV and DVDs offer no benefit to babies and toddlers.

Resources:

www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/03/03/babies.watch.TV/index.html.

http://www.zerotothree.org/site/PageServer

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This is one of the funniest children’s books I’ve read! I laughed out loud when I read it and then read it to my co-worker who was in tears when she heard it.  This is Michael Ian Black’s first children’s book.  I have been a fan of his since The State and Ed and was interested in seeing what he would write for children.  Some parents may not see the humor in it or find it appropriate but I think kids will love it. 

To get right down to it the book is about animal’s rear ends.  From chicken cheeks to deer rear.  They are climbing on top of each other to reach a bee hive.  But unfortunately, they all fall down and the ends go flying. 

I really enjoyed reading it and I’ve shared it with my daughter but I don’t think I could read it aloud to a group of kids especially in a school setting. I think it is a great book for parents to read to older kids, especially boys, who would appreciate the humor a little.  If not the illustrations are cute too and the storyline is easily followed.



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  • Amber: Thanks for sharing my blog with your readers! You summed up the reason for the name better than I've been able to :) Good luck in the giveaway!
  • Musing: I wasn't able to finish Twilight myself, but I'm always glad to hear of young people being turned on to reading. :)
  • juliannahelt: I forgot about Twelve Hats for Lena. It is a great book! Thanks for mentioning it.